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to go to brazil six months ago, if you told me the u.s. had just run faster, -- grown faster, 2.7%, we're expecting the u.s. economy to grow to%. the reason i raise this is to go down there and talk to policy makers and business people. we could have more taxes here, more regulation there. a little more cost of labor here. and a fair amount of uncertainty and take on one of the great economic miracles. they understand this thing they have a great economy growing rapidly is fragile and requires government to facilitate rather than later uncertainty. that is almost like a test tube of forcing. we had a time in which we had a huge amount of uncertainty. comes from -- some comes from government action. we had an aggressive regulatory agenda. we have not made a certain investments we have made. you add that up and you have a period in which businesses are operating under huge weight. creates the conditions under which businesses can operate in intellectual freedom. among the things government can do is create the conditions under which cost [no audio] to allow businesses to innovate. >> one
later, we will discuss the recent increase in u.s. manufacturing. we will also take your calls, e- mails and tweets. "washington journal" is next. host: good morning, it's wednesday, december 19, 2012. the white house has thrown its support behind several gun- control measures on tuesday in the wake of the shooting rampage in newtown, connecticut. a state department inquiry into the september 11 terror attack in benghazi, libya, criticized the agency harshly for inadequate security that -- but specificrecommend signi individuals. and we begin today in on the details of john boehner's plan to avoid the fiscal cliff. we want to hear from you. how optimistic are you that a compromise can still be reached before the end of the year? give us a call -- and you can get up with us on all your social media web sites on facebook and twitter, or e- mail us. a very good morning to you. i want to take you to the lead story in today's washington post. that was today's washington post. here's the headlines from "politico" today. i want to take you to speaker john boehner's comments on the state
to corporate employees. foreign hackers constantly target u.s. companies in such ways in order to get every piece of competitive intelligence information they can. we simply cannot allow this to continue to happen. in response to this growing threat in our 2011 annual report, the u.s. intellectual property coordinator called upon congress to increase the penalties for economic espionage and this bill is consistent with that recommendation. i would like to commend the members of both sides of the aisle for their work on this bill, particularly the gentleman from texas, the chair of the committee, mr. smith, the ranking member, the gentleman from michigan, mr. conyers, the incoming chair of the judiciary committee, my colleague from virginia, mr. goodlatte and the gentleman from north carolina, mr. watt, who worked diligently on this bill and i recognize the leadership of senator lay high and i -- leahy. and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is -- the gentleman from texas -- mr. scott: i yield ba
just how nonlife- u.s. unemployment benefits are. a lot of the against -- non- lavish u.s. unemployment benefits are. the two countries that he mentioned, the netherlands and belgium, they're doing much better than other continental european countries. the scandinavian countries have guest: there is not this simple relationship that have been extensive unemployment insurance system and you mechanically generate a higher unemployment rate. host: lisa from dallas, texas, received unemployment insurance -- nate from dallas, texas, receives unemployment insurance. caller: right now i lost my job because my boss was fired from the university. and recently got my doctoral degree from that university, and i am spending eight hours a day on the computer, trying to network. i want to buck the contention that it is a mismatch of skills between the employer and the people that are unemployed. there was a recent "wall street journal" saying that part of the problem is how employers conduct searches of candidates, and her recruiting is done. -- how recruiting is done. i think the unemployment benefi
of skilled workers coming from our country, u.s. schools, u.s. workforces. that is the skills contact at the country could easily get behind and support. that is highly important as we think of the skills issue going forward. some of the issues i heard talked about before critical to that as well. what are we doing in the pipeline? what are we doing from the earliest ages to make sure that under-represented groups are taking to science? why do we have to drop off at middle school around young women? what are the long-term strategy is? we have to attack this on all cylinders and have and all of the above the strategy. but while we are doing the long- term strategy to have a bit of supply of stem and high skilled workers, we should not take our eye off what we can do in the short term. one of the most powerful statistics that came out of the president's science and technology council was the idea that you could have a significant effect on the number of workers we had if you just ensured that you had a higher graduation rate among those who declared a stem major in their freshman year.
for calling. a live picture of the u.s. capitol. 7:23 in washington. some heavy rain and perhaps some snow. a. when terry mix are expecting in town. we mention that because the president is heading back into town. the senate and white house -- the senate and house are due back tomorrow. this is an politico. there is another piece of this morning that says the house member elect is also interested in the peak in the seat -- adapter the seat. springfield, va., lewis, an independent. caller: good morning. you could consider me a little bit pessimistic. i am actually looking at it as realistically as possible. i have a degree in macroeconomics. i believe that they all should be -- we should institute term limits on all of them. maybe a six-year term limit. they're all thinking of reelection. host: both sides? caller: yes. they are thinking about re- election with the country is almost $70 trillion in debt. -- $17 trillion. people and businesses are giving out payouts because taxes are going up on everyone. it does not matter -- there are too many taxes going up. payroll taxes going up. we do not
. . this is where the u.s. needs to stand firm. it's how we can stand firm for freedom. i encourage the passage of this resolution, and i encourage that we as a body will continue to stand for a free and open internet. and with that i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the question is will the house suspend the rules and agree to senate concurrent resolution 50. as many as are in favor will signify by saying aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair -- black plaque mr. speaker, i ask for a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the concurrent resolution is agreed to -- mrs. blackburn: i ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. all those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20 and the chair's prior announcement, further proceedings on this motion will
required on all firearm purchases instead of the fractions of sales that get done today. 408% of u.s. gun sales are by private sellers who are not required to perform background checks. you can be a three-time convicted felon, a serial domestic abuser, severely mentally ill, or even on a terrorist watch list and still go to a gun show or go on the internet and buy whatever gun you want. the american people want to strengthen their bases to prevent the mentally ill from buying gun. but over a million disqualifying mental health records are still missing from states. 10 states have failed to flag a single person as mentally ill. and 17 states list less than 100 people. miles per hour people want to see assault weapons bans reinstated and large capacity ammunition clps banned to keep dangerous ammunition out of the hands of mad men. let's face it. when you put a 30-round clip in an assault weapon, you are not protecting your home. you are not hunting deer, you are hunting people. we have hid from this fight for too long. for too long we have used politics and the second amendment to cover up
was the longest u.s. serving member. he was elected to the house of representatives in 1952 and the u.s. senate in 1958. two former staffers, ira schapiro and david corbin, talked about the senator's life. next on c-span, nikki haley. >> the first speaker is irish schapiro. -- ira shapiro. he played important roles in foreign intelligence surveillance and the completing of the metrorail system. during the clinton administration, it he served as a leading u.s. trader and .arned the rank of staff thaman he was described as antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. se
powerful machines and he wins every election. he gets to the u.s. senate, he climbs the leadership ladder and defeats prominent liberal senators. he selected the senate whip by ousting ted kennedy. he defeated former vice president of the united states, hubert. it is always a fight for byrd. had to fight for everything he got for west virginia. he had to fight. the trouble is, what direction to take the book in? how to convey these two objectives? it came to me while sitting on the senate floor when he delivered his speech. to celebrate his 50 years of senate and the u.s. senate. the floor staff asked us to wait a few minutes since the senators were on their way there. they wanted to hear byrd talk. we discussed these incidents. he kept relating to the presidency. i worked with this president. he worked with jimmy carter. it started dawning on me -- the presidents. after the speech, it dawned on me -- no other person in american history has had an impact on so many presidential administrations. he has impacted 11 presidents. and that is 1/4 of presidents in american history. i could achie
it is embarrassing to compared government funding for amtrak with u.s. government funding for domestic aviation and highway speed passenger >> to build and maintain one of the best highways systems in the world, we've spent $114 billion and built it over 45 years and today it would be $126 billion. con jex on our roads are at historic levels and by 2020 urban interstates will be at or over capacity. and anyone who has had the pleasure of flying recently they know the problems that plag our nation's airport ch airports, in fact, in spite of all this amtrak carries more riders from new york to boston than all other airlines put together. 50% of people that travel this distance. and between washington d.c. and new york city, amtrak carries twice as many passengers as all airlines come bind. today it carries 75% of inner city travel letters between new york and washington. amtrak has done all this with the threat of funding cuts and privatization especially of the profitable northeast corridor hanging over its head. we know that in other parts of the world privatization of hig
will push for stronger gun control laws. question for you is and should u.s. gun laws change? here are the numbers to call -- you can also find us online. send us a tweet or join the conversation on facebook, or send us an e-mail. our question for you is whether u.s. gun laws should change? here's the headline in "usa today" -- jumping down into the story, it says -- others are exploring the question of gun laws. we will hear some comments from members of congress this morning. congressional democrats are vowing to push for stricter gun control laws. several democratic lawmakers called yesterday for a new push for gun restrictions, including a ban on military-style assault weapons in the wake of the connecticut massacre. democratic senator dianne feinstein is the author of an assault weapons ban that lapsed in 2004. she said she would introduce new legislation soon. senator dick durbin said that lawmakers will hold hearings on gun-control and several others said they would devote attention to the issue. president obama says action is needed. "ere's the store in "usa today -- and th
minutes that legislators have been mentioned and people have mentioned various talk show host. u.s. a call at 202-585-3881 for republicans -- give us a call. 202-585-3880 for democrats. you can send us a tweet, twitter.com/cspanwj. facebook, as well, facebook.com/cspan. journal@c-span.org. this is lee in wyoming. host: give us a call and let us know who your political hero is. the story after the new ttown shooting. this is the front page of "the new york times." host: the story goes on. this is luke rosak. host: it goes on to talk about that story. front page of "the new york daily news." this stemming from upstate new york about a sniper that set fire to a building and goes on to shoot two firemen as they were trying to take care of the fire. eric from pittsburgh, pennsylvania on the democrat's line. good morning. caller: michael moore. host: i'm sorry? caller: michael moore. capitalism is dead. host: george, good morning. caller: good morning. george will. he is not an office holder and has no intention of running for public office. he gave a lecture in st. louis on december 4 and it wa
legislation he's sponsoring which will allow more highly skilled immigrants the u.s. that's live at 7:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> i think riders institute is something that's important within the culture. we are a culture of words of voices. words are key to our imagination, our capacity to envision things. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page of writing but i think that there is no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps film. but there is something in literature that cap chures the hunal spirit. >> this weekend join book tv as we look tpwhind scenes at the literary life of new york's capital city albany. >> senators from new york and new jersey say hurricane sandy caused $5 billion worth of damage to rail subway and port infrastructure in their state. they testified on surface transportation yesterday. >> i call this hearing to order. thank you for joining us, mr. secretary. i asked you to testify today because i'm deeply concerned about the recent report that the f.h.a. could potentially need taxpayer support for the first time in its 78-year histo
, where it fell. at no time were the missiles a threat towards america. on the international front, the u.s. moves to shore up syrian opposition groups. the obama administration has designated a group there a terrorist organization and will collectively recognize the coalition of syrian groups as legitimate representatives of the country. this is information that we learned from an interview that president obama did with abc news. in line with that, the u.s. will formally recognize the opposition council as the leader of the syrian people. officials say that the u.s. afghan force may total 9000 after the year 2014. the obama administration plans to keep between 6009 thousand troops in afghanistan after 2014 and they will confine most of them to fortified garrisons near the capital, leaving afghan troops largely without american the advisers in the field. another story from afghanistan -- "slow gains in justice for females." women who are victims of violence often report abuse that -- rarely report abuses to government authorities and rarely see their cases go to trial." that is a story in "
skilled immigrants on the u.s. economy. a panel talks about how immigration laws affects mat scuents. we'll hear from mark warner. hosted by the university of virginia's center this is about an hour and 20 minutes. >> thank you, david. good evening. welcome to the national press club for the keynote round tail. i would like to pay special tribute to mark kaplan whose vision has made this annual conference possible. his commitment to public service has been stead fast through the years and we're grateful for his abiding friendship. i also want to recognize, as david has, the hard work of david, mike, jeff, of the center. who is responsible for convening this group of scholars, poice makers, and key figures from the private sector. as david highlighted this session i should point out that we examined the full spectrum over high skilled immigration in an effort to refrain current thinking about admission policies or highly skilled foreign born workers. experts provide different perspectives on the suggest and discuss the benefits and limitations of current and proposed policies. simply put,
according to what is institutionally appropriate. the u.s., there will be a friend of syrian meeting. reports are is that the u.s. is preparing to recognize transitional governments if one were out of this new revolutionary coalition. if there is a transitional government that is recognized, what will the relationship be to these councils that are more ad hoc? are these local? council local do they have to be -- are these local council sustainable? do they have to be accountable for the structures that may emerge? what is the sustainability in the future of these councils? >> they can build their relations. people have to survive. during my stay both in aleppo and italy you see every day, especially if you could to center aleppo, it is bombing. it is a warm toward situation -- war torn situation. different italians were able to unite. one of the first issues was to get them out of the city. it is much more likely that you get bombed. based on they got bombed. -- later on they got bombs. the first challenge is that the city has to be able to defend themselves. how are they going to be
announcing that i am appointing our next u.s. senator to be congressman, tim scott. [applause] many people have asked what went into this decision process and it was simple. he understands the strength need to have as we continue to focus on jobs. he has shown that with his support knowing the deepening needs to be there. he has shown courage with this fiscal representation. he knows the value of a dollar. he understands what every family in small business goes through. it also shows that this man of south carolina. he is very aware that what he does and every vote he makes a backstop carolina and our country. it is with that that i knew he was the right person. they understand that this is the right u.s. center for our state and country. it is very important to me as a minority female that congressman scott earned this seat. he earned this seat before the results he has shown. he earned this seat for what i know he is going to do in making south carolina and our country proud. with that i would like to introduce to you our senate select tim scott. >> thank you very much. this is a great d
again at those five most important words from my perspective in the middle of the preamble of the u.s. constitution, providing for the common defense, that we are doing that and exactly that with this measure. so i encourage my colleagues to support this conference -- the rule and the conference report that we will have and i believe it will be of great benefit to our men and women in uniform and to the future security of the united states of america and our allies and i thank my friend for yielding me the 15 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: i yield 1 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. altmire. mr. altmire: mr. speaker, as we begin debate on this act, it's critical we understand just how important it is to our troops and to our country that we pass this legislation with a bipartisan vote. it's easy to get bogged down in partisanship on most issues, but this cannot be one of them. this legislation provides the men and women of our armed forces the necessary equipment and financial support to ef
found in the past that that aid is both used to feed the military and sold for hard currency. u.s. policy toward north korea hoping that north korea will give up its weapons for aid has been a failure. it's been a bipartisan failure, frankly, for decades, and it's gotten us now to this point. the hope that north korea can be induced to abandon its ambitions for nuclear weapons and missiles distracts us, north. it distracts us from pursuing the very policies that might actually change the behavior of the regime and support its people. going forward, we need to move away from an unimaginative policy here to one with energy and creativity and focus, so let's tackle north korea's illicit activities, its counterfeiting of u.s. currency. this regime will do anything for money. it is, as many north koreans will tell you, it is a gangster regime. let's interfere with those shipments and disrupt the bank accounts that are used. let's ramp up radio broadcast in the country where there is information wall that is cracking. and let's help the refugees who are literally dying to escape the pri
work in the u.s. house of representatives in 1978, in the office of the general clerk under then majority leader john rhodes. where he learned the intricacies of the house and legislative procedures while keeping official minutes in this chamber. in 1979 he began working in the republican cloakroom where he remained for seven years before beginning a new position as floor assistance it -- floor assistant to the republican leader in 1986. since then jay has served as floor assistant to three speakers of the house, including newt gingrich, dennis hastert and the current speaker, john boehner. the career that has spanned over 35 years, jay has served as an invaluable role for so many members in helping them to learn the ways of the u.s. house of representatives. i'm proud to be among those who have benefited from jay's service and friendship and leadership. but jay isn't just known for his expertise in parliamentary procedure. he's known to be an individual of substance and distinct professionalism. in fact, i personally would say he's the embodiment of a professional which is
didn'tou deal with the sequester earlier in i said, you mean like back in may when the u.s. house paed the only sequester replacement bill to be passed in this town. back in may. they said maybe that takes care of the sequester problem. think said what about the tax rates? i said what about in august new york a bipartisan way, we passed a bill, in this house, to extend current tax rates, to prevent tax rates from going up. i took another question from up with of the folks who said, but what about that senate bill people keep talking about? what about the senate bl? why won't that get a vote in the house. i said actually quite unusual in the rules committee you don't see it often but rules committee waived all the points of order, took all the roadblocks out of the way, in an unprecedented way to allow what we called the levin amendment, which was basically exactly the plan the president has been pushing, to raise toongs family-owned businesses, to punish job creator well, took that vote on the house floor. i'm proud to say that again in a bipartisan way republicans and democrats came t
. the guy in the back. >> is today the ambassador to syria reiterated the fear that if the u.s. provides weapons to the syrian opposition they will wind up in the hands of extremists. i was wondering if you could speak about what the new coalition is specifically doing to build a closer relationship with the three syrian army and various militias fighting on the ground. it seems more likely the syrian opposition will receive assistance if the new coalition can show they are in away unified with the people doing the fighting. >> thank you. >> the u.s. position has been repeated many times that we will not give assistance, it may go to the wrong hands. if the u.s. stays in its position, they are getting the money from some groups in the gulf countries or in other areas. you can play a role in the transition rather than waiting until the transition is done. the lack of support, we see the increasing influence of t. this is the fear we have. this is a shared concern of the international community. we do not need the nature of the syrian people -- committed to the international community and
the u.s. president should take a in terms of a more realistic, short-term approach to facing challenges are a long term visionary approach where the focus is on the future and where we are going in the next 10-20 years. which of the following approaches to you think a u.s. presidential candidate should take? you will see two options. should a u.s. president take a practical approach and difficult times addressing near-term challenges or a visionary approach focusing on long-term goals for the future and not losing perspective of where we want to go to? go ahead and text to 22333. the response code you agree with et.you can tweak at @gt we will see if it matches the opinion poll. a fair size minority, about the 44% felt short-term obstacles was the important focus of the nation. it looks like once again we have come close to the national poll with 67% of the audience i in the room and online voting for a visionary approach looking at long-term goals for the country instead of a short-term perspective. i think this would be another good thing for elected officials to keep a in mind as the
over the cliff. that the u.s. consumer is crucial to growth, they went on to say, because it made up 70% of gdp. some are predicting a recession, a downgrade of our rating for the country. you think it would be ok to go over the cliff? caller: put it this way. only in the last 2000 years of human existence, every time a country goes above 20% tax rate, they failed. rome, babylon. go throughout human history. we are saying it is a 50% tax rate now. what about an 80% tax rate? we cannot survive as a government entity by having so many man hires attached to the host. host: another item attached to the table for debate is whether or not to extend the payroll tax holiday. this headline states that there is little interest in renewing the tax holiday. it is now 4.2%. the average annual savings for employees earning about $60,000 per year is 1200 thousand dollars -- well hundred dollars more in your savings account. -- $1,200 more in your savings account. there is not much interest on capitol hill in saving this. we are talking about getting access to the pockets of 160 million workers. john,
. >> we have four minutes left. with regard to the state of the u.s. economy, you have some important votes cast before the lame-duck session is over. what is your level of confidence about the future of the u.s. economy right now? >> i am not really optimistic. i think that we have a short- term solution. the president wants to spend more money. i understand that. he also wants to raise taxes on people over $250,000 and he will get part of that. he will have a bill that says we have to give everyone a tax cut, who will vote against that? he has the ability to wait. that is number one. we are trillions of dollars in the hole. not just $16 trillion but $60 trillion or $70 trillion. this will come back to haunt us. we will have a severe economic problem. i hope i am wrong. i hope there is a solution. unless something radical changes, we will see a severe economic problems and high inflation. >> you made the decision not to run again. what will you miss most about congress? >> i will miss the camaraderie. i was one of the founders of the republican study committee which started with four
in u.s. military operations? guest: special operations forces have played an increasing role over the last decade, since they are designed to confront a regular presence of a wide variety, not only terrorism but insurgency, countering weapons of mass destruction and so forth, so they have a very wide mission. they have also grown greatly in the last decade. they are partly a number of about 33,000 uniformed badged special operations forces and they come from the navy, marines, army, air force. host: in terms of the budget, over the last decade, it was to $0.5 billion in 2001 during now it is in excess of $10.5 billion today. guest: that's right. the budget has almost quintupled. a great deal of that has also gone to the high end -- both the expansion and personnel, because people do cost money, the training and salaries for them, but also to a lot of this has gone to the high end special mission units and equipping them with state-of- the-art communications, stealth helicopters, a number of state of the art commands interest, also, the special operations command down in tampa, bef
and by the u.s. and international maritime industry. we have done a good part of the job. i think we met our responsibility. i am pleased that we are here to authorize for a period of two years the united states coast guard. its operations and its programs, and support the men and women who support us. with that i urge the passage of h.r. 2838, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from washington. mr. larsen: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. larsen: i rise in support of the resolution introduced by my colleague from new jersey and chairman of the subcommittee, mr. lobiondo. before i begin my remarks, i want to join mr. mica and of course many others in offering my condolences to the entire coast guard family for the tragic loss of one of their shape mates during a drug interdiction operation in the waters off of southern california this past weekend. we all recognize that the service men and women of the coast guard willingly and ro
of manufacturing in the u.s. washington journal, live every morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> house speaker john boehner today proposed letting tax rates go up on income above $1 million as a short-term step to avoid some of the fiscal cliff. the white house and democratic leaders rejected his offer. we will hear from speaker boehner next. we will also get reaction from democratic house members and senators and later, a news conference with the brady campaign to prevent gun violence. >> our first experience was to come in a different way than every family up here. after dad was sworn in, we took a picture of the family behind the oval office desk. that night, we did not get to move into the white house because nixon have left so quickly, they left their doctor -- daughter and son in law to pack all their clothes and belongings. we had to go back to our little house in alexandria, virginia. the neighborhood was surrounded by secret service. we had in the boehner -- we had been living there. that night, mom was cooking dinner. we were sitting around the dinner table and she looks over
. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was standing on the edge of the hotel ballroom taking and one of life's great moments. the marriage of the daugh
, it pays $285, a u.s. just put $200 ridicule in your truck. he spent $36 one-way on a bridge, $18 through the tunnel, next year it goes up to $48 for the bridge. $24 for the fort mchenry tunnel. i mean, nothing leaves nothing. it's getting out of hand. it used to be a pretty good deal to be a truck driver. now i am not so sure anymore. i just don't know what the next step is. . -- 2013 tax deal is scary me a little. host: -- that is just a portion of what is in the new york times this morning. next is mary in sun city, california. go ahead. we are listening. caller: i am in the rental business in california. i hear california is very big on welfare and section 8. i see there are so many programs where somebody gets to stay home and the government will pay a three-bedroom rent and they only pay $14 a month. they stay home for 10 years, 15 years, or whatever simply because they have children. being in the military, a lot of my friends, the parents work. but these people are not in the military and they get medical, they get food stamps, they get wic. there's never a change in the programs t
its limits, only the private and public working together can get the u.s. economy fully back on track. in particular it will be critical that fiscal policymakers come together soon to achieve longer term fiscal sustainability without adopting policies that could derail the ongoing policy. thank you. i would be happy to answer your questions. >> i guess i have ad. unemproacr -- you have another paragraph that's not just targeted something else. so what good are these targets if you have to reference the calendar date? >> we will be learning about what unintended consequences they make, and we will see what else happens to the economy that affects the levels of unemployment, for example, that we hope to achieve. so for that reason, as i discussed in my opening remarks, we decided to make the right ra for asset -- criteria for asset purchases qualitative right now because we have a number of issues we need to look at before we go forward. rates were well understood and we understand the relationships between those and rate increases and the state of the economy. so we have been able to g
: to me, the most irresponsible comment came on tv yesterday by a u.s. senator dianne feinstein who is rushing to resurrect a bill on gun control. the most responsible set of comments came from the n.r.a. which said at the beginning when the events begin unfolding on tv let's wait for all the facts to come in. i'm calling as a former v.a. homeless outreach worker in rest l.a. one third of america's homeless are military veterans. every one of them could be off the street with mental health problems and so forth if the v.a. would process the claims that have been four and a half years delayed. we sue the v.a. in the ninth u.s. circuit court of appeals in may of last year. the government under obama and holder appealed that win before the three justices panel in may of last year to the full court which set aside our victory and veterans are now back to square one with no mental health issues from a v.a. under a former four-star army general who refuses to process our benefits claim. host: ok. here is paul on twitter. my question is how will balm care -- obama care address the shortage
a factory in china and sell cars. they can delay paying u.s. taxes on that indefinitely. but the money comes from the rent, as so-called passive income, they have to pay taxes on that immediately. this provision says if your a bank -- you can be late paying your taxes. it is going to be considered active income. it is quite valuable to them. it is kind of a gray area. in 1986 when they did big tax reform, they said that is active income and we should tax that money. host: we have been talking with sam goldfarb from cq roll call. thank you very much. >> explores the history and literary culture of all money -- of albany. tonight on c-span, a senate debate on the fiscal cliff. shaun donovan discusses it. harry reid and mitch mcconnell when back-and-forth on fiscal cliff issues and a proposal to raise the debt ceiling. here is part of their exchange. >> yesterday afternoon, i came to the floor and offered president obama's proposal on the fiscal cliff to show that neither he nor democrats in congress are acting in good faith in these negotiations. with just a few weeks ago before a potentially
at the calendar, but we are about of time here, folks. this is not funny. people's livelihoods are at stake. the u.s. economy is at stake. millions of families are counting on us to do something. tois the president's job find a solution that can pass the congress. he is the only one who can do it. this is not john boehner's problem to solve. he has done his part. he has bent over backwards. mr. president, how about rallying in your party around a solution? i have said many times before -- we cannot solve the problems we face unless or until the president of the united states either finds the will or develops the ability to lead. this is a moment that calls for presidential leadership. that is the way out of this. it is that simple. does anybody wonder why we keep going from crisis to crisis around here? anybody notice a pattern? this does not have to be a crisis. this is an opportunity. once again, the president ignored it. he held rallies and partisan speeches after he had been reelected. as i said yesterday, i think it is obvious that the president wants to go off the cliff. i know most of the ame
, on the september 11 attack on the u.s. mission in benghazi that killed ambassadors christie and and three other americans. what the report told us was there were gross security failures in benghazi, that the mission was inadequately staffed and inadequately secured. and unprepared for the attack that happened. it assign blame to two bureaus -- the bureau of diplomatic security, the bureau of near eastern affairs, and the head of that board, former undersecretary of state thomas. and former joint chiefs chairman admiral mike mullen determine the blame should fall at the assistant secretary level, midlevel your credit manager. not political appointees. these are foreign service officers and government employees who had careers in the state department, positions of decision making. what is interesting is that only one official actually resigned, eric boswell, the head of diplomatic security. three other officials were placed on administrative leave. that administrative leave could go one of two leaves. it could be fired or fight for their rights and be reassigned. the point here is that the state
administration, he served as a leading u.s. trader and earned the rank of staffman. -- ambassador. he was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. -- david corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about th
of u.s. code. by dissenting that argument in public and then recommending the public and the court their views. host: this proposal by republicans does not include any thing to raise the debt ceiling. caller: i know but they are going to have to do that. also, john boehner -- this proposal has $160 billion less than he offered before the election and also raises the money taken out of medicare and medicaid by $62 billion. how democrats or anybody could except that -- could accept that. the average folks here in america do not want to pay their fair share. they cannot argue the point that everybody has to give a little bit more to help us eliminate some of this debt and keep the country going in a positive direction. host: did you see the reaction from harry reid? caller: [laughter] host: let me read a portion of that. that is what the democratic leader in the senate had to say about yesterday's counterproposal put out by house republicans. we noted in this letter sent to the white house from the speaker also includes the signatures of paul ryan as well as eric cantor and the rest o
of pennsylvania. his research includes the u.s. economy, tax policy, and the stock market. he is previously a senior economist at the board of governors at the federal reserve system. he went to that graduate school of business at columbia university. he has worked for both the george w. bush and clinton administrations. both of you went to the same university. i'm sure you can agree on everything today. dr. zandi first. >> thank you for the opportunity. it is an honor to be here with kevin, a good friend of mine. let me say that these are my own personal views. lawmakers have to resolve three issues -- first, the fiscal cliff. second, raising the treasury debt ceiling, which as you know is becoming an issue rarely soon. third, achieving long-term fiscal sustainability. that is deficit reduction and tax increases and spending cuts that allow the gdp ratio to stabilize by the end of the decade. these three things need to be done now. in terms of the fiscal cliff, if policy is unchanged and we go over the cliff and there is still no change after that, the gdp in 2013 will 3.5 percentage point
of the washington post, amid this turmoil, aid for egypt is on its way. the u.s. and a coalition of international lenders are pushing ahead with billions of dollars of loans and other help for egypt and neighboring states. so, money going to the country despite the violence there. and on the domestic front, the richmond times dispatch, courtesy of the newseum, health care law includes from a surprising $60 coverage free. bob in rapid city, south dakota, republican caller. caller: whee are a right-to- work state. in the past week we had an article in the newspaper that we are 16th in the nation in income. we averaged 44,000. where is the nation averages 41,000. so it's just not true that a right-to-work state means lower income. our unemployment rate is around 5% or 5.2. host: 4.5%, according to this washington times piece this morning. caller: our union membership in the state is 5.6%. so it is not very high. we have three of the poorest counties in the country, and south dakota, also. those are primarily indian reservations. without those numbers pulling the numbers down, we would be even higher
in the u.s., 34% have one adl limitation. we looked at all the states and to apportion their of their people over age 60 and compared it to the national standard 34%. and so, obviously some states are going to have the low 34 percent and some will the way higher. if you look at the very dark space and the central part of the country, which includes kentucky, alabama, west virginia, those are the states that if you recruited -- include a limitation on adl, they have a very large population that falls into that category. the lightly colored states -- nevada,, roddick, minnesota, some of the others -- those states have basically a much healthier population over age 60. they have a much lower percentage of people over age 60 that have at least one limitation on their ability to continue independent living. if you wanted to move toward a full beneficiary equity, you would want to incorporate cost factors, and some of the key factors would be things like wages, food, the program provides meals to older people, office space, and so on. we did not complete the analysis but we h
questions from the audience. hosted by the u.s. chamber of commerce this is just under an hour. >> thank you very much. thank you, everyone, for being here this morning. especially those who traveled to be with us. it's nice to close the doors from the rest of washington and the fiscal cliff debate for a little while and talk about fiscal challenges elsewhere. whether it's a good news or bad news, at least it gives us an opportunity to talk about something a little bit different than the news of the day in this final two weeks, i think, before hopefully congress finds an opportunity to either avoid or move or solve some of the fiscal cliff issues and fiscal challenges that we face. and thank you for dick gravich and the work of the panel and the commission he co--led. there are copies of that report that were available when you came in. it's an excellent document that i really encourage everyone to take a close read. it's filled with good analytics in terms of what's going on on the state level. to help us understand. and i fully agree, dick, with your comments earlier about the disconnect.
like. you're going to see the u.s. senate become stronger because of the results of tim scott, not because of what he looks like. so this is not -- that's why i said he earned this spot. i understand that we made history today and i am proud that we made history today. i also believe in the people of south carolina and the people of this country. as the daughter of indian immigrants that saw early on that you can be anything you want to be and nothing can get in your way, i want to remind everybody that is not the messenger, it will always be the message. tim scott has the right message. >> [inaudible] >> from my perspective, if you get the message right and you market it well, people listen. america is still a center right nation. the fact is that the better we get at marketing our message, the more it will resonate. i think fresh faces and authenticity goes a long way in the political process. you don't have to save the best, but you have to go there. we'll go to new places and new territories and new lands in many ways. this message of conservatism will reach the ends of th
purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 359, the nays are 35. the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 359, the nays are 36 with one member voting present. 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. vote vote -- the unfinned -- -- the unfinished business is the vote on the amendment to the bill on which the yeas and nays were ordered. the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 3683, an act to provide for a comprehensive strategy to counter iran's growing hostile presence, an activity in the western hemisphere and for other purposes. senate amendment. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and concur in the senate amendment. members will record their votes by electronic device. this will be a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united
of the republican study committee of the u.s. congress. we are privileged to host this event, to welcome the incoming chairman, and to thank the outgoing chairman, for their service. this is a special friendship between aei and the irs see that we have cultivated, which has been very rewarding for us. it is very unusual to have an event like this, with the outgoing and incoming leaders, for any organization. but the nature of these leaders makes it more likely than what we would see with most other organizations. the republican study committee -- this is language from the charter. i will read it, because i think it speaks volumes about what they are trying to achieve. the committee was founded to serve as an ideological rallying point, where conservatives can stand on the basis of principle, were committed men and women without formal leadership positions can affect a change on their first state in congress, a coming up with a sound policy idea and by articulating a powerful position. it is a friendship we have cultivated for years, especially with executive director paul keller, a great
, the u.s. capital -- capitol, america, your congress is in session and we're here to work. yet my republican colleagues refuse to bring up the middle class tax cut bill that is right behind me at this desk. now my colleague from texas can continue to talk about what happened in august of this year. you know, staging votes for the election, that took place. i know the results of the election. when our constituents are concerned -- what our constituents are concerned about is what happens in january, if and when we fail to do our work here now. and also, to expose that the vote that took place in august was a vote to continue the bush era tax cuts. the very same tax cuts that got us into the mess we are in right now. and they're doing that because they're holding hostage the 98% of americans who receive a tax cut under mr. walz's bill before -- that's at the desk today. and they're holding them hostage to make sure that the 2%, the wealthiest 2% don't get that tax cut. our economy is 70% driven by con -- is consumer driven. that means we -- when the middle class spends more, we all
against the u.s. skimping on care. host: this from sasha -- guest: that is one proposal that gets floated by democrats. medicare part d bargains for drugs. i do not know -- i do not think it would be a cure all, the one proposal that would fix everything. democrats think it would reduce the cost of medicare. host: is there a plan b? guest: we have seen them as the january 1 deadline before and get 30-day extensions. at some point they were working without an extension. medicare told doctors to hold off on submitting your claims for a little bit. that is a situation we have ended up in before. we'rere talking months, talking about big pay cuts for medicare doctors. medicare doctors. that would be uncharted territory. host: joe from arizona on the republican line. caller: good morning. if we look at it logically, sarah is on the right track. we have become a society with honesty as a technicality. you can get more money but you break the law. our society -- you need to stop your people on the show, politicians and say, i asked you a question and you didn't answer it. this is why the doctors
in london. it is the uk equivalent of ashford in the u.s. i know that because the two cables down the east coast of africa both have their major london.n from there it is a straight shot. it is a fascinating place. it is in the same spot as the ancient report. -- port. this is the place where the international -- >> where are these undersea cables that you referred to earlier? and by whom? >> there have an telegraph cables across the atlantic for 150 years now. depending on how you count, individual strands or cable systems, there are about eight or 10 or 12 across the atlantic. the current generation was laid in the mid-90s. up until about 2002. they are owned by a few companies. very large backbone companies. they are owned by telecom, verizon, british telecom joining with deutsche telekom. or a couple are owned by companies that only own cables across the atlantic. they bought their people out of bankruptcy out of a larger telecom. -we specialize in new york or london. we will sell you services to another telecom or anyone who meets high-capacity bandwidth. >> what about this pacific? >
to think about a senate bill, i do believe in term limits. i guaranteed it in the u.s. house and i will certainly have a certain number of terms. in you start in the middle, where do you go from there? 12 to 14 years from this point is a good number. two full terms would be fantastic. but i better win the first one or the second one doesn't really matter much. [inaudible question] my understanding is january 3. >> [inaudible] what do you think you can accomplish now [inaudible] -- >> i think the first thing that i'll recognize is the south will become the entire capital of the country because i'll be putting more miles on my tires, because now i have two years to represent the entire state and get re-elected by 2014. one of the things i hope we work on from the senate will be the same thing that i worked on in the house, which is when you look at the problems of our country, they are simply spending problems primarily. we cannot address from congress many of the issues and challenges that really affect americans. that's something that starts at home. the things that we can affect i
with the spending problem when this recession started, and all of the u.s. department of transportation, there was one federal bureaucrat that made over $175,000 a year. 18 months later, there was 1690 bureaucrats making above $170,000 a year. that is just not sustainable. right now today in the u.s. department of education, average salary across the board in the federal department of education, the average salary is $102,000 a year. isaverage teacher's salary $42,000 the year, less than half of what federal bureaucrats are making. most of them have never talked a child to read. we need to leave those dollars in the hands of the states and the people and let the teachers be able to teach. i have been very critical of president bush with notes have left behind -- no child left behind. i hear teachers all over the country i have talked to and they all agree with me we need to get rid of no child left behind. we need to leave those dollars in the hands of the states and the people, and that is one area of spending where we could do so. students would be in a whole lot better situation. the
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